Tag Archives: lighthouse

The Lakeside Inn at Mount Dora

An Unexpected Surprise at The Lakeside Inn at Mount Dora

We were excited about our visit to Mount Dora and The Lakeside Inn appeared to be quite promising. We happily stepped up to the front desk, gave our names and confirmation number, and…were told…

“We gave away your room.”

WHAT????

“We can give you a Garden Room.”

No, we reserved a lakeside room. After all, we were staying at The Lakeside Inn. We had stressed the importance of making this a special visit. We wanted to wake up in the morning with a pretty view of water between our toes. Gardens I can get at home! I was not a happy camper. I made sounds about accommodations somewhere else.

“Please sit down and have a complimentary glass of wine while I go speak with the manager.”

Ten minutes later, the Lakeside Inn manager emerged, and said the folks in our reserved room were not willing to move, but she’d found a room in the building closest to the water, bottom floor, steps to the beach and boardwalk.

Relieved to actually have a room, we gathered our belongings and headed for our room. Which ends up being in the BASEMENT. This is a picture of the building we stayed in. Our window is the large one at the bottom of the building:

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Our windows were level with the ground. As people walked by, we saw feet.

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I looked out at the small beach and saw two of those noisy little jet skis parked at the water’s edge, directly in front of our room. The room itself seems okay, other than feeling as if I’m in the bowels of the building.

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The closet area has an iron and ironing board…that’s good. I make a mental note to request a few more hangers. Call me crazy, but one hanger for two people just isn’t going cut it.

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There’s a blow dryer in the make-up/changing anteroom. The bathroom is nice with pedestal sink and other Victorian touches. A bit dirty behind the base of the sink, but I can live with that. The folks above us, in our originally reserved room, seem quiet. On our way out to check the dock area and grounds, we stop a housekeeper and request the extra hangers.

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The dock area is cool. It stretches out far into the lake and ends in a large octagonal deck complete with a pseudo lighthouse in the middle. The lake is quiet, which surprises us, being a Friday evening.

We had a lovely conversation with a man who filled us in on the history of the town, how he’d come to settle there, the lake, etc. We look up to the window of what should have been our room at The Lakeside Inn. It looks empty. The curtains are open. We decided to walk the downtown area and get some dinner, so we left our history buff to his thoughts and made the very short walk to Donnelly Street.

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Even though our stay at The Lakeside Inn in Mount Dora left a lot to be desired, we enjoyed exploring the area, but that’s in the next post…

Mount Dora, a Florida Town With New England Ambiance

Mount Dora has New England Ambience With a Southern Twist

When we slipped away to Mount Dora, we weren’t sure what to expect. It’s a small town situated on Lake Dora (where else?), about a 40 minute drive from Orlando. The trip up was pleasant, listening to NPR radio until it faded, then switching to CDs. I think my favorite town on the way was Howey-In-The-Hills. I just love that name! It’s a pretty town and I think there’s a winery nearby. Didn’t find Howey, though. I hope to return one day to explore the area.

While St. Augustine has a decidedly European feel to it, Mount Dora seems like a trip to New England, with gently rolling hills, quaint storefronts, and Victorian homes. We’d visited for a day last summer for a juried art show. The streets were so crowded, though, that we began to feel like salmon trying to swim upstream and agreed to return when life was quieter. We chose our dates correctly, as we learned from a shopkeeper that this coming weekend is their annual craft fair, which draws even larger crowds than the art shows!

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I explored lodging options on the internet, checked the AAA book, and settled on The Lakeside Inn. I called the inn and made reservations, asking for a lakeside view in a preferred room. I was given “The Great Gatsby” stay, which included two nights, two continental breakfasts, and one dinner with a complimentary bottle of wine. I explained that this was a delayed birthday celebration and we wanted it to be a bit special.

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I thought I’d chosen well. The inn is on the National Historic Registry. The pictures on the website were lovely, showing the original inn and it’s two additional buildings, nice pool and grounds, tennis courts, cobblestone drive, you name it. Stretching out into the lake, a long dock ended in an octagonal seating area, complete with replica lighthouse. We’d mentioned the trip to a subcontractor, who said he and his wife had enjoyed their stay there, but to watch the bill. Note to self: red flags wave for a reason.

We arrived around five P.M. The wide front porch and the white high-back wicker rocking chairs looked inviting. The lobby itself is huge, chairs clustered around a large fireplace, other seating areas scattered around here and there. The one hundred year old wood floor was worn smooth and shiny from decades of use and the front desk still retained it’s original key cubbies and buzzers. A pretty staircase led to the second story of the main building, and off to the left was the bar and a lovely dining room with floor to ceiling French doors that bowed out to the gardens and the vintage train that runs to Orlando and back.

As we waited our turn for check-in, I turned to my husband and said I thought I’d made a great choice. He agreed and we glanced through the brochures about the inn and the town of Mount Dora, discussing what we wanted to do first and time constraints.

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We were in for quite a surprise!

 

 

Dog Island Name Origin and Ownership

How Was Dog Island Named and Who Owns It?

Dog Island is actually a bit of land (less than 7 miles) that separated from St. George Island, and is one of a group of barrier islands that protect St. George Sound and Apalachicola Bay. It even sported a lighthouse at one time, built in 1838, that was later destroyed in 1899 by a hurricane that devastated the mainland town of Carrabelle.

There are various stories surrounding the origins of its name, the most outlandish being that it is a sanctuary for dogs to live out their last years without the stress of urban life. Untrue! I did see one dog with its owner walking on the beach one day, though. Some claim Dog Island is so named because the shape resembles a crouching dog. I don’t buy into that one, either. I thought that perhaps the origin of the name was connected to a stray dog that had been found on the empty island or a similar story, but it turned out not to be the case.

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There are two more likely explanations. Wikipedia attributes the name origin to the French, who discovered it in 1536, listing wild dogs, the shape of the island, and the practice of dropping sailors (known as “dogs”) there before going in to the mainland, preventing the men from abandoning ship, as the origin of the island’s name.

I think our ferry captain, Rusty Cahoon, is probably a bit more accurate. During the Civil War, Union armies would transport prisoners by boat, using Dog Island as a drop-off point. The prisoners were referred to as “Sea Dogs”. While the commanding officers went into town to drink and secure supplies, those left behind were unlikely to attempt an escape with a risky swim to shore.
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The story of Dog Island ownership is an interesting one. Evidence (pot shards, a 9th century canoe) of early Native American presence has been uncovered, and later, piracy and smuggling occurred. At one time, the island supported a thriving turpentine business, but it wasn’t until Florida businessman Jeff Lewis purchased it shortly after World War II that the idea of development began to threaten the area. Mr. Lewis, it seems, had some very definite ideas concerning the island and its future. While he did sell some lots to individuals, most of the island is now owned by the Nature Conservancy, which helps protect the fragile ecosystem on Dog Island, including the annual turtle-nesting season.

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The Nature Conservancy and the private homeowners value this island, as do most visitors. Help keep the area pristine by doing all you can to minimize your carbon footprint while here.